When it comes to fall leaves, it seems like there are two types of people. There are those who love them, think they are beautiful and find useful ways of disposing of them.

And then there are those who hate them, consider them a nuisance and when fall arrives, they are out shopping for a chainsaw in order to solve their leaf problem once and for all.img_1170

I have to say that I like the leaves in the fall, particularly the orange, red and yellow ones. We have four large maple trees in our yard so you can imagine all the leaves that I have to deal with every fall. But I don’t consider it that much of a problem.

Trout season closed on the last day of October so the number of my fishing trips have decreased except for a few trips this winter during the catch and release season if the weather cooperates. So I have the time to deal with the leaves and I really don’t mind doing so.

First of all, I like to rake them. I know that probably sounds un-American but I find that raking leaves is very good exercise. You can burn a lot of calories using the old broom rake plus it is a lot quieter than using one of those loud leaf blowers.  img_1139

I don’t own a leaf blower myself, mainly because of the noise and the old broom rake wins hands down in that respect. I’m not one of those guys who wake up all the neighbors at 7 a.m. on a Saturday morning with that irritating sound emanating from a leaf blower.

Something else to consider about leaves is that they make a great mulch for your flower beds and vegetable gardens and best of all – they’re free! Like pennies from Heaven.   pile them up around the bases of my rose bushes to protect them from the cold until the spring.

If you have oak tree leaves, your acid-loving plants like azaleas, rhododendrons and blueberries will not only get protection from the cold but an extra fertilizer boost also. And remember the best thing – they’re free!

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