When the weather people recently started talking about an ice storm heading our way, it was time for my wife and I to think about hibernation for a few days.

So a huge pot of chili began simmering on the stove and I began wondering if my fly boxes were sufficiently stocked for the upcoming opening of trout season in Missouri. I guess that’s how trains of thought run in my head. First, food and then fishing.  

Oh well. If I’m going to be stuck in the house for a few days, at least I can tie some flies and enjoy some fantastic chili.

An inventory of my flies revealed a shortage of a very important fly. Only two Blue-Winged Olive dry flies could be found. Something will have to be done about that. When I go fishing, I insist on being fully equipped with a full arsenal of all my favorite flies and only two of this particular fly just isn’t going to work.

Instead of the traditional, Catskill style of fashioning dry flies, I make use of CDC (cul-de-canard) for the wings and partridge for the hackle, which makes my version of the fly easier and cheaper to tie.

CDC feathers from a duck are those that the duck rubs its bill on so it can preen itself. They are naturally oily which gives the fly extra buoyancy. The partridge does a better job of representing legs than other hackle.

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