The 2016 Christmas weekend was a good one. The weather was near perfect, my whole family was home, and the hunting was outstanding.

Now do not get me wrong. I did not spend the entire holiday weekend in the field.

However, on Saturday morning I did manage to sneak down for a goose hunt with my good friend and waterfowl-hunting expert, Kevin Brunstein.

Our purpose for this hunt was two-fold. First, Kevin had just recently gotten permission to goose hunt a cornfield very near his home.

In Shaman camo and blowing Mountain Screamer calls, Mike Roux brought home the Christmas geese.

When I say “very near,” I mean it. We actually drove our ATVs, pulling trailers filled with full-bodied decoys, right from his house. We hunted within sight of his yard.

The other purpose for this hunt was to field test some new duck and goose calls from MOUNTAIN SCREAMER GAME CALLS. Needless to say, these new calls were awesome and I will tell you much more about them in subsequent articles.

Let’s just say, for now, that they performed brilliantly.

Kevin and I got there early and sat up on a rise in the middle of the field. I was shooting some new waterfowl loads from WINCHESTER called, “X-tended Range Hi Density.”

I was shooting “B” sized shot. There were lots of geese in the air, even before first light.

Kevin always has his geese patterned pretty well. He watches them closely and knows where they are likely to feed and at about what times.

He hunts different fields in the morning than he does in the evening. His prediction for this holiday hunt was for things to heat up a bit after 8 a.m.

He nailed it again.

The geese were roosting on three different bodies of water within a couple of miles of this field. We really only needed one flock to decide to come to us for breakfast.

We had the vast majority of the geese to our north, but the geese that came from the south were the ones that wanted to play our game.

We do not have a fancy setup for these hunts. Kevin has the birds scouted. We put out about six dozen full-bodied goose decoys and then just lay down between rows of cut corn.

Kevin wears some kind of cornfield camo and I wear the grassland pattern made by SHAMAN CAMOUFLAGE, out of Wichita, Kansas.

Brunstein is also a firm believer in flagging geese. He is very successful with his technique and gets the attention of most of the geese we kill. When we get two flags flapping, we really get them to notice us.

The first shots came from my gun and came way too quickly. I got excited and shot too soon on a single goose that, in retrospect, would probably have landed in the decoys.  

After Kevin’s sermon I agreed that he was right and that I should have been more patient.

The next birds in were much more “reachable.” We both stopped flagging as the eight huge birds set their wings and began their approach.

A single goose peeled off to my side as the flock swung over Kevin. Two big Canada geese hit the deck among cheers from happy hunters.

“Now that’s the way it’s supposed to work!” Kevin yelled as he pumped his fist in victory. “These new calls are great!”

“They pulled ‘em right in,” I replied.

Before long another group of six geese hit the same glide path. This time we did no flagging. We wanted to see if we could use just the calls to coax the small flock into range.

When Kevin said “take ‘em,” the geese were at less than 20 yards and only two shots rang out as the lead pair folded in mid-air.

With two limits down in two hours, it was time for us to return to our families and to our holiday festivities.

But this short trip afield was the icing on our cake and the calls, the camo, and the new shells all did their jobs amazingly well.

(Mike Roux is the Midwest Regional Director  the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) Outdoor Ministry. To become a Home Team Member of this new ministry, call him at 217-257-7895.)